Oxford Nanopore Technologies Ltd

MinION is a pocket-sized portable device used for real-time biological analysis. It is adaptable to the analysis of DNA, RNA, or proteins. MinION's simple workflow allows end-to-end experiments in many environments.

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PromethION combines MinION's simplicity of use with greater workflow flexibility through scale and a modular design. Increase throughput by analysing the same sample simultaneously in multiple flow cells, or run different samples concurrently.

The GridION system, currently in development, is a scalable real-time analysis system designed to analyse single molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

Metrichor provides a cloud-based platform for real time analysis of data from nanopore devices. Applications available through Metrichor will expand with the ultimate goal of enabling the analysis of any living thing, by any user, in any environment.

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Register to join the MinION Access Programme (MAP) to use MinION – our portable, real-time molecular analysis tool.

Technology advisory board - Professor Hagan Bayley
Professor Hagan Bayley
Professor Hagan Bayley
Company founder, University of Oxford
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Professor Bayley is Professor of Chemical Biology in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Oxford. Educated at the University of Oxford, Professor Bayley spent most of his academic career at leading US academic institutions, including Harvard, MIT, the University of Massachusetts and Texas A&M University. He returned to the UK in 2003 to his current post. Oxford's Chemistry department is now the largest in the western world, and it has recently completed the construction of state-of-the-art facilities for multidisciplinary chemistry research in which Professor Bayley's laboratory is housed.

Professor Bayley's research interests lie in the exploration of membrane protein structure and function, and the use of molecular engineering techniques that transform these proteins into unique measurement systems for exploring the chemistry of individual molecules. Of particular interest are the analysis of DNA at the single molecule level, and the potential for ultra-fast gene sequencing using nanopores. Professor Bayley founded Oxford NanoLabs (now Oxford Nanopore) in 2005.