Oxford Nanopore Technologies Ltd

MinION is a pocket-sized portable device used for real-time biological analysis. It is adaptable to the analysis of DNA, RNA, or proteins. MinION's simple workflow allows end-to-end experiments in many environments.

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PromethION combines MinION's simplicity of use with greater workflow flexibility through scale and a modular design. Increase throughput by analysing the same sample simultaneously in multiple flow cells, or run different samples concurrently.

The GridION system, currently in development, is a scalable real-time analysis system designed to analyse single molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

Metrichor provides a cloud-based platform for real time analysis of data from nanopore devices. Applications available through Metrichor will expand with the ultimate goal of enabling the analysis of any living thing, by any user, in any environment.

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Register to join the MinION Access Programme (MAP) to use MinION – our portable, real-time molecular analysis tool.

Technology advisory board - Professor Jene Golovchenko
Professor Jene Golovchenko
Professor Jene Golovchenko
Harvard University
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Professor Golovchenko is Rumsford Professor of Physics and Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics at Harvard University. His broad research career has encompassed research posts at Harvard University and Aarhus University in Denmark, and industry positions at Bell Labs, in national laboratories at Brookhaven and Livermore and at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. He is also a member of the Rowland Institute for Science, an interdisciplinary non-profit basic research institute in Cambridge.

The Harvard Nanopore Group
The Harvard Nanopore Group is led by Professor Daniel Branton and Professor Jene Golovchenko. The group has been investigating electronic methods for very rapidly detecting, characterising and sequencing single molecules of DNA. A detector consisting of a single nanopore in a thin, insulating, solid-state membrane could mimic the function of alpha hemolysin pores in lipid bilayers, while serving as a platform for integrated electronic detection devices. The group’s research has lead to the development of a new ion-beam-based method for creating nanoscale structures in semiconductors called 'ion beam sculpting'.

The group is also developing other applications that may utilise the sensitivity and speed of nanopore probing, and is investigating the physics of DNA polymer movement through the confined space of a nanopore, co-ordinating the application of material science tools to fabricate solid-state nanopores, and developing the associated biochemistry, molecular biology, electronics, and signal processing to effect molecular recognition.

Professor Golovchenko specialises in studying the fundamental interactions of radiation and matter and the application of this knowledge to revealing and controlling the properties of materials.